Jazzpresso

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Jazz this moment and the next

Jazzpresso series continues with thoughts about what is "new" in jazz, and its internationality. Master-of-none festival promoter and radio-dj Matti Nives keeps bringing new phenomena and ideas into the Finnish jazz scene year after year, and this time he speaks his mind about showcases and "new Nordic jazz", after his visit to the 17th Young Nordic Jazz Comets showcase at the Umeå Jazz Festival in Northern Sweden on the 27th of October. 


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Jazz Finland International: My Daily Bread Around The World

There has been a lot of discussion about international market for Finnish jazz in the Jazzpresso series too. Finns are known to be concerned about how the rest of the world sees us, and jazz field isn't any different. Annamaija Saarela is one of the frontwomen for Finnish jazz abroad, and well known figure in the European jazz scene for her work as an agent, and also as the President for Europe Jazz Network. Her Annamaija Music Company leads a new jazz export project called Jazz Finland International. How does she feel about the current pathway to European arenas? Are we marching in waving a blue-and-white flag?


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Of the Force of Musical Expression

Saxophonist Jorma Tapio has been called as the "outlaw of Finnish jazz". In the new Jazzpresso edition Tapio explores the concept of expression and finding a true sound.


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Does it swing?

What is jazz? What is improvisation and inspiration? Classically educated drummer, percussionist Janne Tuomi is a frequent visitor in various jazz occasions, but doesn't want to be labelled a jazz musician.



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How I was drawn to Finnish music

Pianist-composer and co-owner of the British Edition Records label, Dave Stapleton is no stranger to Finnish jazz and musicianship. Edition has released i.e. Verneri Pohjola's, Olavi Louhivuori's and Alexi Tuomarila's music. In the latest Jazzpresso he reveals why the Finns have a special place in his heart.


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A Finnish Jazz Artist’s Progress

Verneri Pohjola, the fourth contributor to the Jazzpresso article series, shares the twists and turns of his career as an international jazz artist. Pohjola highlights that especially in the 2010s it is impossible to give definitive steps to international success. Instead, he believes that a key to success may lie in two skills: the ability to count on one's artistic vision and the readiness to adapt to the changing nature of a jazz musician's profession.


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Towards free solos and collective tunes

Next writer in the Jazzpresso series is pianist Jussi Fredriksson. Turku-born Fredriksson represents Finnish jazz profession at its best - or worst - as he produces events, runs a record label and participates in the culture-political discourse. Fredriksson is not concerned about the demise of tradition in jazz music, but instead is contemplating over how to protect the artistic liberty and independence.


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Tentative Ideas Concerning the Fluid Nature of Jazz

In his opening article for the Jazzpresso article series, Professor Jukkis Uotila tackled the current state of jazz and the potential degeneration of jazz music’s original Afro-American tradition. He aimed his text to the next debater, saxophonist Jukka Perko. Perko takes the floor and provides some echoes and alternative angles for Uotila's ideas that proved hot potatoes in the social media.


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What will happen to the tradition of jazz music in the future?

The first, quite controversial piece in the Jazzpresso series is by professor, composer, pianist and drummer Jukkis Uotila. Uotila has a long career as a pedagogue at the Finnish Sibelius Academy. The article is aimed at saxophonist Jukka Perko, who will be the next writer in the Jazzpresso series. Read and join the coffee table discussions in social media!